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c\e.%0OCH\H 



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:_ 







Barcode Number 


Box Number 


Total of 
Volumes 


Call Number 






H 

01 


in i 

Nlllll 

>0 


Ur- ( 

Him inn ii 

534 


MHHH| 

929 7 


l: 


3^6 


25 j 








LIBRARY 

]!ij]i»|B"S'!!iiM 


OF CONGRES! 


II 


32£> 


w 








111 


1 




III 






020 


534 930*3' 


L 




















































C 




... - i J— 







X-E 160 










NATIONAL PARK 









^1 




j 



X-E 160 



NATIONAL PARK - COLORADO 




X-E Uo 




u 



^3 



STATE PARKS 

AND 

RELATED RECREATIONAL AREAS 



ACREAGE AND ACCOMMODATIONS 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1946 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
U ? NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
BRANCH OF LANDS 




NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 



KENTUCKY 



X-I 160 




MAINE 




National Monument 




X-E 160 








hiricahua 

National Monument 




•• 



X-E lbO 
•tffr 

CUSTER BATTLEFIELD 
NATIONAL MONUMENT 



MONTANA 







u 



Jewel Cave 

National Monument 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



X-E 160 



WT 




The walls of the underground chambers of Jewel 
Cave are lined with a unique solid coating of 
dog-tooth calcite crystals which sparkle like jew- 
els in the light; hence the name, Jewel Cave. 
Because of this unique formation and attractive 
range of color, the cave and a small protective 
surface area were set aside as a national monu- 
ment by Presidential proclamation on February 
7, 1908. The National Park Service is responsible 
for its administration and protection. The cave 
is available for the visitor to see and at the same 
time it is preserved in as nearly a natural state as 
possible. 

HOW TO REACH THE 
MONUMENT 

The cave is located in the Black Hills near the 
southwestern boundary of South Dakota adja- 
cent to U. S. Highway No. 16 leading west to 
Yellowstone National Park. 




It is accessible from the following railroad 
stations: Custer, S. Dak., and Newcasrle, Wyo., 
both on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad. 

HISTORY 

Jewel Cave is a small but interesting cavern. The 
area was originally recorded as a mining claim, 
known as the Jewel Lode, after its discovery by 
two prospectors, Albert and F. W Michaud, on 
August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud brothers 
were attracted by the noise of wind coming from 
a small hole in the limestone cliffs on the east 
side of Hell Canyon. In the hope of discovering 
valuable minerals, and locating the source of the 
wind, these men, in company with Charles Bush, 
enlarged the opening. 

The Michaud brothers believed that they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great inter- 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Newton B. Drury, Director 



> ,4i 



Jewel Cave 

National Monument 



SOUTH DAKOTA 









^ 



ftJal « 





The walls of the underground chambers of Jewel 
Cave are lined with a unique solid coating of 
dog-tooth calcite crystals which sparkle like jew- 
els in the light; hence the name, Jewel Cave. 
Because of this unique formation and attractive 
range of color, the cave and a small protective 
surface area were set aside as a national monu- 
ment by Presidential proclamation on February 
7, 1908. The National Park Service is responsible 
for its administration and protection. The cave 
is available for the visitor to see and at the same 
time it is preserved in as nearly a natural state as 
possible. 

HOW TO REACH THE 
MONUMENT 

The cave is located in the Black Hills near the 
southwestern boundary of South Dakota adja- 
cent to U. S. Highway No. 16 leading west to 
Yellowstone National Park. 



It is accessible from the following railroad 
stations: Custer, S. Dak., and Newcastle, Wyo., 
both on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad. 

HISTORY 

Jewel Cave is a small but interesting cavern. The 
area was originally recorded as a mining claim, 
known as the Jewel Lode, after its discovery by 
two prospectors, Albert and F. W. Michaud, on 
August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud brothers 
were attracted by the noise of wind coming from 
a small hole in the limestone cliffs on the east 
side of Hell Canyon. In the hope of discovering 
valuable minerals, and locating the source of the 
wind, these men, in company with Charles Bush, 
enlarged the opening. 

The Michaud brothers believed that they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great inter- 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Newton B. Drury, Director 







Lincoln Memorial 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 





National Historical Park 

NEW JERSEY 



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C ALI FORN I A 




CALIFORNIA 



The Lower Ruin 





TON TO 

/VationaJk sncmMnmt 



ARIZONA 



The Lower Ruin 



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TONTO 



ARIZONA 




%nderbilt 
Mansion 



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X-E 160 
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National Monument 



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CANYON 

NATIONAL PARK • UTAH 



The Old Church Tower 
at Jamestown 

X-E 160 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
COOPERATING WITH THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 



Mountain 

NATIONAL 
MILITARY PARK 



SOUTH CAROLINA 




X-E 160 
.■'Oii 



#23 




NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 



KENTUCKY 



I 




niieicwi 



NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD SITE 

Maryland 



I-E 160 




App 

X-E 160 

U)fc 




$zs 



L fOX COURT 



21 
50 



HOUSE 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL MONUMENT • VIRGINIA 



r 




X-E 160 



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Bandelier 



NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 

A 7 ^ Mexico 



U 160 

■Uf, 



■ 





NATIONAL 



•■ 



MONUMENT 

New Mexico 



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• be 




PARKWAY 

VIRGINIA -NORTH CAROLINA 



X-E lf>0 
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Capulin 

MOUNTAIN 







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1 ■■'■•*' ' i- •--% 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 

New Mexico 



f. 




NATIONAL PARK . . New Mexico 




hirkahua 

National Monument 






X-E 160 
-06 



tf2U 



Colorado 




National Monument 



R A D O 



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X-E 160 $:%<: 

Colorado^, 



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National Monument 



I O R A D O 



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Washington " 



MARYLAND 



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National Historical Park 

NEW JERSEY 




NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD PARK . VIRGINIA 




FALEM MARITIME 
NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



Massachusetts 

in if 



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Falem maritime 
national historic site 

Massachusetts 

$ 




X-E 160 




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TIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 

New York 




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STONES 
RIVER 



National Military Park • Tennessee 



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UNSET CRATER 



National Monument 



ARIZONA 



/ 







National Monument 



ARIZONA 



NATIONAL 
PARK • UTAH 





CANYON 

NATIONAL PARK__*, JUTAH 





NATIONAL MONUMENT 







X-E lfeQ 



#5^ * 
so 




CHALMETTE 



National 

Historical 

Park 



LOUISIANA 




COMMEMORATING THE 
BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS 



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NATIONAL PARK . Arkansas 




The Old Church Tower 
at Jamestown 



X-E 160 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
COOPERATING WITH THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 



' 



The Old Church Tower 
at Jamestown 

X-E ISO 

.Of, 




THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
COOPERATING WITH THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 



t. 



^Mountain 

NATIONAL 
MILITARY PARK 



SOUTH CAROLINA 




t. 




!. 




MOORE 
HOUSE 

Yorktown Battlefield 

COLONIAL NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 

1 ... 

01 Virginia 

5fl 




I 



X-E 160 
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NATURAL BRIDGES 



National Monument 





* 






Petrified Forest 

NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 



X-E 160 



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R I 



O N 



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Fredericksburg and SpoU 



X-E 160 



NATIONAL 

MILITARY 

PARK 

Virginia 




X-E 160 




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o 



ave 

National Monument 

SOUTH DAKOTA 



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Jewel Cave is a small, beautiful, and in- 
teresting cavern. The walls of many of its 
underground chambers are lined with a solid 
coating of dogtooth calcite crystals which 
sparkle like jewels in the light; hence, the 
name Jewel Cave. Because of this unique 
formation and an attractive range of color, 
the cave and a small protective surface area 
were set aside as a national monument by 
Presidential proclamation on February 7, 
1908. The National Park Service is respon- 
sible for its administration and protection. 
The cave is available for the visitor to see and 
enjoy and at the same time it is preserved in 
as nearly a natural state as possible. 

HISTORY 

The area was originally recorded as a min- 
ing claim, known as Jewel Lode, after its 
discovery by two prospectors, Albert and 
F. W. Michaud, on August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud broth- 
ers were attracted by the noise of wind com- 
ing from a small hole in the limestone cliffs 



on the east side of Hell Canyon. In the 
hope of discovering valuable minerals and 
locating the source of the wind, these men, 
in company with Charles Bush, enlarged the 
opening. 

The Michaud brothers believed they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great 
interest to tourists in the Black Hills. They 
built a log house nearby for the accommoda- 
tion of visitors. However, they were unable 
to attract enough people to make this venture 
a financial success. 

When the area was established as a na- 
tional monument, the land was a part of the 
Black Hills National Forest. The area re- 
mained under the administration of the 
United States Forest Service until April 1, 
1934, when, by Executive order, the Presi- 
dent transferred the area to the National 
Park Service. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Jewel Cave National Monument is located 
on a high, rolling plateau ranging from 5,200 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Newton B. Drury, Director 



r; 



■ 



Tonto Cliff Dwelli 



X-E 160 





^^m^m^i^E^iE^ 



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TONTO 

/Vatiom^ /Monument 



ARIZONA 



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inns 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 

New Mexico 




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a. .. • . ■> -. >_ ,-ndS? 1 






DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA and MARYLAND 



X-E HO 




hickamauga Battlefield 



CHICKAMAUGA AND CHATTANOOGA NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

Georgia and Tennessee 






r; 



t/l 

CUSTER BATTLEFIELD 
NATIONAL MONUMENT 



MONTANA 




f. 



X-E 160 




$13l 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 

National Park Service, Conrad L. Wirth, Director 

Richmond National Battlefield Park Self-guide Tour of 

Fort Harrison 



RICHMOND NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD PARK is 3. Unit of the National 
i» Park System administered by the National Park Service 
of the United States Department of the Interior. The System 
is dedicated to the conservation of America's scenic, scientific, 
and historic heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the people. 
Please help to preserve the natural and historic features by re- 
fraining from disturbing, cutting, or destroying wild flowers, 
plants, shrubs, trees, signs and markers, or any other objects 
within the park. Exploring or digging for or removal of 
relics is expressly forbidden. 



This folder is intended to help you attain a clearer understanding of the wartime 
remains of Fort Harrison. The original earthworks, bombproof s, gun positions, 
and other features of the fort are left as they were found. For additional history 
on the fort and park consult the free informational folder or obtain a more detailed 
story from the Richmond National Battlefield Park 20-page booklet on sale in the 
museum and headquarters (log cabin) nearby 

PLEASE STAY ON THE FOOT TRAIL 






#73 



NATURALIST 
PROGRAM 



JUNE 




GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS 
NATIONAL PARK 

TENNESSEE— NORTH CAROLINA 



NATURALIST SERVICE 

By means of guided field trips and illustrated talks, it is aimed to make the 
visitor better acquainted with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and 
its plant and animal life. On the longer hikes, places of outstanding scenic 
interest are visited. Regardless of the objective, stops are made at frequent 
intervals, and trailside objects are discussed. Hikers should wear comfortable 
shoes and heavy socks. Unless indicated, no registration is necessary. The 
illustrated talks, no matter where they are given, are open to the public. These 
trips and talks are offered without charge by the National Park Service. 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of the INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



n 



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I '53 






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PETERSBURG 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



VIRGINIA 




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Point Park 



. HI 



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Lookout Mountain 
and Chattanooga 
Battlefields 





SOUTH DAKOTA 




r: s - '""• 



NATIONAL 

X-E ' <■" " 



1 60 



(MAP OF PARK INSIDE) 








J 



GOING TO 
NATIONAL 

X-E 160 


VISIT 
PARK 


A 

9 

a 

*7? 


JHNHi 












53 




A Handbook for Boy Scout 
Jamboree Leaders, Issued by 

National Park Service 
U. S. Department of the Interior 

1953 



)(-e it© 

■. . u k 




1 



• Adams • 

National Historic Site 
* ^Massachusetts * 








Johnson 



National 
Monument 



N N 




Appomatto 

COURT HOUSE 




NATIONAL HISTORICAL MONUMENT . VIRGINIA 



%-£ I to 




SOUTH 



DAKOTA 



X-E 160 



Carlsbad 




' 



t-E 'to 

- UQ, 




Castle 



CLINTON 




* I 

* -if? 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 
New York 




X-t 160 






T>eath %Jalley 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 



NEVADA 




' 



. 0<O 




DINOSAUR 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



COLORADO 



UTAH 




DINOSAUR 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



COLORADO 



UTAH 






FEDERAL 



; 4 




S 

22 
'Si 



HALL 

Memorial 



r- „. 




FORT HUNT, VIRGINIA 




An Historical Sketch 
by 
Robert T. Nelson 
Interpretive Specialist, National Capital Parks 

The War Department, desiring to establish a coastal defense forti- 
fication, for the protection. of the Nation's Capital, decided -to locate a 
fort -at Sheridan's Point on the Potomac River, eleven and onerhalf miles 
south of Washington, L. C, and 105 miles from the Atlantic Coast. This 
land, just across Little Hunting Creek from Mount Vernon, was originally 
a portion of the George Washington estate of 5000 acres acquired by a 
grant to John Washington, the great-grandfather of George Washington, 
in April 1669. This area stretched down the Potomac River between Dogue 
Creek and Little Hunting Creek, Settlers in the Little Hunting Creek 
vicinity built a fort on the Potomac River in I676 as a protection against 
the Indians of the Susquehannock tribe t The land purchased for the site 
of the fort to be known as Fort Hunt was once a part of the River Farm, 
one of five farms owned by George "Vashington and forming part of the Mount 
Vernon estate. 

The United States acquired, February 29, 1892, ninety acres of 
land at Sheridan' s Point — known as the "Pelton" tract — from the 
legislature of the State of Virginia by act of cession. On July 7, 1903, 

the United States condemned and purchased 1C5 acres of adjacent land 

the "Grau" tract — from John Miller of Fairfax County, Virginia, arid on 
October 11, 1906, another portion of 1.633 acres. On June 1, 1906, F. G. 
Pcrcival deeded to the United States the right-of-wa:/ to the nearby 






X-E 160 




SEEING . . . 

GENERAL GRANT GROVE 



General Grant Grove once was a part of the most extensive of all giant sequoia forests. 
Of the original forest, little more than this 4-square-mile area was saved from lumbering 
when Congress set it aside as a national park in 1890. Discovered in 1862 by Joseph 
Hardin Thomas, the General Grant Tree, from which the grove takes its name, was named 
in 1867 by Mrs. Lucretia P. Baker. For 50 years General Grant Grove was known as 
General Grant National Park. When Kings Canyon National Park was established in 
1940 it became part of that park. The Redwood Mountain Grove area, containing a 
magnificent sequoia forest, was added a short time later. Today, the centrally located 
General Grant Grove serves as an excellent base point for drives into Kings Canyon, 
along the Generals Highway to Giant Forest, or for trail trips into the high mountain 
wilderness of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. 

AROUT THE GIANT SEQUOIAS 

The giant sequoias are so well proportioned, and display such symmetry and balance, 
that often it is difficult to appreciate their true size. Actual measurements, the experience 
of walking around one, or of standing in a fire-hollowed trunk soon convince one that 
they truly deserve to be called "the largest of living things." Members of a genus that in 
the geologic past populated much of the northern hemisphere, this species now is found 
in separated groves only along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. Another species, 
the coast redwood, grows near the coast of central and northern California. 

After you have studied these trees for size, after you have meditated on their great 
age, after you have enjoyed their beauty of color and form, other features of these trees 
will be noticed. Perhaps the following will answer some of the questions that will occur 
to you: 

A Mixed Forest — The sugar pine and ponderosa pine are especially noteworthy in 
the forests of General Grant Grove. White fir and incense-cedar also will be observed in 
association with the giant sequoia. 

Seeds and Cones — The ovoid, thick-scaled, rather small cone produces many seeds. 
Find one that has been cut down by squirrels and see if you can shake out some seeds. 

Young Sequoias — The seeds germinate only in exposed mineral soil in open places, 
not in the shaded forest. Look for young trees near General Grant Tree, along the 
highway, and in General Grant Village. 

The Crowns — Young sequoias are sharp spires in silhouette, with dense foliage down 
to ground level. In early maturity, the lower branches are lost. Later, most of the upper 
branches drop away, leaving a few to grow larger, branch out, and lift up. These form 
the typical domelike crown of older trees. 

Snag Tops — Injury to the tree may cause the crown to die back. 

Fire Scars— Repeated fires of lightning origin during the past were responsible for 
these black scars and hollows. Fire very rarely kills the larger trees, because they are 
protected by thick fibrous bark. 

Recuperation — Notice how the bark grows around and over the fire scars. 

Death of a Sequoia — The giant sequoia resists death by fire, lightning, insects, or 
disease. It dies, as a general rule, only when it loses balance, because of softening of the 
earth or erosion, and crashes to the ground. 



X-£ \<<>o 

- UG 



NATURALIST 
PROGRAM 



MAY 
19 5 3 




5 
51 



MAY 
19 5 3 



GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS 
NATIONAL PARK 

TENNESSEE— NORTH CAROLINA 



NATURALIST SERVICE 

By means of guided field trips and illustrated talks, it is aimed to make the 
visitor better acquainted with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and 
its plant and animal life. On the longer hikes, places of outstanding scenic 
interest are visited. Regardless of the objective, -stops are made at frequent 
intervals, and trailside objects are discussed. Hikers should wear comfortable 
shoes and heavy socks. Unless indicated, no registration is necessary. The 
illustrated talks, no matter where they are given, are open to the public. These 
trips and talks are offered without charge by the National Park Service. 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of the INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



OOVE 



X-E 160 

Ufc 









*?6 



NATIONAL PARK • Arkansas 




X-E (to 



Jewel Cave-y 

National Monument 




SOUTH DAKOTA 



Jewel Cave is a small but interesting cav- 
ern. The walls of many of its underground 
chambers are lined with a solid coating of 
dogtooth calcite crystals which sparkle like 
jewels in the light; hence, the name Jewel 
Cave. Because of this unique formation and 
an attractive range of color, the cave and a 
protective surface area of 1,274.56 acres were 
set aside as a national monument by Presi- 
dential proclamation on February 7, 1908. 
The National Park Service is responsible for 
its administration and protection. The cave 
is available for the visitor to see and enjoy 
and at the same time it is preserved in as 
nearly a natural state as possible. 

HISTORY 

The area was originally recorded as a min- 
ing claim, known as Jewel Lode, after its 
discovery by two prospectors, Albert and 
F. W. Michaud, on August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud broth- 
ers were attracted by the noise of wind com- 
ing from a small hole in the limestone cliffs 





on the east side of Hell Canyon. In the 
hope of discovering valuable minerals and 
locating the source of the wind, these men, 
in company with Charles Bush, enlarged the 
opening. 

The Michaud brothers believed they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great 
interest to tourists in the Black Hills. They 
built a log house nearby for the accommoda- 
tion of visitors. However, they were unable 
to attract enough people to make this venture 
a financial success. 

When the area was established as a na- 
tional monument, the land was a part of the 
Black Hills National Forest. The area re- 
mained under the administration of the 
United States Forest Service until April 1, 
1934, when, by Executive order, the Presi- 
dent transferred the area to the National 
Park Service. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Jewel Cave National Monument is located 
on a high, rolling plateau ranging from 5,200 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Conrad L. Wirth, Director 





NATIONAL MONUMENT • NEVADA 



X-£ \<°° 



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X- 




LINCOLN 
MUSEUM 






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Washington, d. c. 



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NATIONAL PARK 



Alaska 





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NATIONAL MONU 

■oq California 







Organ Pipe Cactus 



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Organ Pipe Cactus 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 




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Petrified Forest 




3 

13 

53 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 



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National Monument 



ARIZONA 








UNSET CRATER 



National Monument 



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ARIZONA 



Y-8 [Co , 

Tooto Cliff Dwelling 



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TONTO 

/VaticmaJfc /nonummt 



ARIZONA 



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National Military Park 

MISSISSIPPI 

4 JAN 2(, 

Copy.^T-1954 








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NATIONAL PARK 



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(Jam0nm 





flBRQHRM LINCOLN #))j 




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I3 H ISTORICAL PARK 

1 

•n KENTUCKY 



The Boundary Oak. Near this famous landmark 
stood the cabin in which Lincoln was born. 



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CAPE HATTERAS 

^ LISttXHPJLISES 



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Capulin 

MOUNTAIN 



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4 APK i 2, 
Copy 19541 



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ip»«t»(«T or 

TMI INTIiiO* 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 

iVfew Mexico 




NATIONAL MONUMENT • IOWA 



FEDERAL HALL 

^Memorial 



X-E 160 . 






4 

Copy 







NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 
NEW YORK CITY 



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James Ed-ward Oglethorpe 



ifacfoucas 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



Georgia 




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James Hdward Oglethorpe 







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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



Georgia 





FORT 
LARAMIE 



National Monument . . . WYOMING 




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NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 



Colorado 




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National Historical Park 

NEW JERSEY 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 



California x-e i eq 







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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



NEW ME 



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(MAP OF PARK INSIDE) 





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NATIONAL MONUMENT • NEW MEXICO 




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National 

Seashore 

Recreational 



NORTH CAROLINA 




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OPEN ALL YEAR 




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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



NEW MEXICO 







*«■* >^«* 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



NEW 



MEXICO 














MB7 







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PERRY'S VICTORY 

and International^^ ^j) 
Peace Memorial "~ 

NATIONAL MONUMENT • OHIO 





flwi 



Death %Jalk 



NATIONAL MONUMENTi^m 

\ 

NEVADA 




CALIFORNIA 




t 



De Soto 



NATIONAL 
MEMORIAL 



x-e i&a 

.Hi, 






Florida 



#/<U 




DEVILS 



X -, E , 160 #/H3 



POSTPILE 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 

CALIFORNIA 




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DINOSAUR 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 



COLORADO •■■ UTAH 



X-E 160 

.U to 4 



*iwr 




ipi-i- 



Fort Matanzas 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



FLORIDA 




■ 



X-E 1 60" 
/Lit, 



111% 




FORT 
NECESSITY 



Washington 



NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD SITE 




PENNSYLVANIA 










^*s 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ML..** 



SELF-GUIDE TOUR m 





• v ^ This folder is intendetflo help you obtain a better understanding of the remains 
.„' of Fort Washington. For additional history on the fort consult the free informational **" 
■folder or the uniformed National Park Service attendant.' 



imiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiillilllllllllllllllllllllllllllirilliulililiijillllllllillllllliltiu 



Washington 




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9 

26 

X-E 160 



Birthplace 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



VIRGINIA 



W 




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George JW^fiington BirtMpiaee ^.q. 

It^ational AConz^meni 

(Qolonial itwp® Qawdl@n 





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\ 



MEN YOU ARE IN THE X- E 1 ^^ 

m m~AW0 PLACE 

of the 

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK 



HIKING 

Will 

CAMPING 

you 

FISHING 

be 

RIDING HORSEBACK 



IF SO— TAKE ALONG A COPY OP THIS BULLETIN 

It is designed to help you keep our wild 
areas in the Great Smoky Mountains National 
Park unspoiled and unmarked by human use. 

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK- 
U. S. Department of the Interior— National Park Service 




NATIONAL MONUMENT • COLORADO 







f 



.. -^ ■ I L *»..*. 



X-E 16' 



r 



4 DEC i 






Guilford Courthouse 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



North Carolina 




t 




HAWAII 

OPEN ALL YEAR 



'% 



4 DEC 2 



Home of 

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT* 57 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



Hyde Park, N. Y. 





JU y 



INDEPENDENCE 

National Historical Park Project -fa Pennsylvania 



*JS<? 



Isle Royale 

National Park Michigan 

x-E 16QF 








National Monument 



W 3 o 



• .j 



SOUTH DAKOTA 




Jewel Cave is a small but interesting cav- 
ern. The walls of many of its underground 
chambers are lined with a solid coating of 
dogtooth calcite crystals which sparkle like 
jewels in the light; hence, the name Jewel 
Cave. Because of this unique formation and 
an attractive range of color, the cave and a 
protective surface area of 1,274.5,6 acres were 
set aside as a national monument by Presi- 
dential proclamation on February 7, 1908. 

HISTORY 

The area was originally recorded as a min- 
ing claim, known as Jewel Lode, after its 
discovery by two prospectors, Albert and 
F. W. Michaud, on August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud broth- 
ers were attracted by the noise of wind com- 
ing from a small hole in the limestone cliffs 
on the east side of Hell Canyon. In the 
hope of discovering valuable minerals and 
locating the source of the wind, these men, 
in company with Charles Bush, enlarged the 
opening. 



The Michaud brothers believed they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great 
interest to tourists in the Black Hills. They 
built a log house nearby for the accommoda- 
tion of visitors. However, they were unable 
to attract enough people to make this venture 
a financial success. 

When the area was established as a na- 
tional monument, the land was a part of the 
Black Hills National Forest. The area re- 
mained under the administration of the 
United States Forest Service until April 1, 
1934, when, by Executive order, the Presi- 
dent transferred the area to the National 
Park Service. 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Jewel Cave National Monument is located 
on a high, rolling plateau ranging from 5,200 
to 5,800 feet above sea level. The plateau 
is broken by many gulches and ravines. The 
entrance to the cave is on the side of one of 
these ravines known as Hell Canyon. 



The National Park System, of which this area is a unit, is dedicated to conserving 
the scenic, scientific, and historic heritage of the United States for the benefit and 
enjoyment of its people. 



t. 










X-E 160 



K[ngs Mountain^ 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



SOUTH CAROLINA 





■ S-- 



X-E 160P 



Kings Mountain 

^ " \ .nee 14 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



\ 40tC 1-1 1 



SOUTH CAROLINA 





ttl&y 



X-E 160 

• 11 to 




National Recreation Area 
ARIZONA NEVADA 



~3mm 





NATIONAL PARK 



Colorado 



x-E lfe0 tiltf 




RUINS ROADS ARE OPEN TO REGISTERED VISITORS 
FROM 8 A. M. TO 6 P. M. 

VISIT THE MUSEUM BOTH BEFORE AND AFTER SEEING THE RUINS. 



ii I . 






Revised Juty~l955 NP-MV-7005 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFtCE : IV. 




> ■■*•*.' 



<!% %*fe 



5/7^ 



.* & 



iPI* 



m *owut 'kma/* 



NATIONAL PARK 



Washington 

x-e rea 




MOUNT 



X-E 160 





National Memorial 



SOUTH DAKOTA 







Mount Vernon 

MEMORIAL HIGHWAY 




Part of the George Washington Memorial Parkway 
Virginia, Maryland, and Districf of Columbia 




MINNESOTA 




4 JAfM 3 

Copy 195? 



Point Park ^ 

Lookout Mountain 



and Chattanooga 
Battlefields 





CHICKAMAUGA AND CHATTANOOGA 
National Military Park Georgia and Tennessee 



tint 



Shenandoah 



NATIONAL PARK 




VIRGINIA 
Jllo 




I'm*- 4 • 



X-E Ibff 



Shenandoah 



NATIONAL PARK 



VIRGINIA 




&4- r 



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t~- nw--r ^^**"^^L m 



e leer 



v 



#117 



U01ACACOR1 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 








X-E 160 # 

the UNITED STATES 

Marine Corps 
War Memorial 







' 




X-E 160 



WHITMAN 



National Monument 



WASHINGTON 




X-E 160] 
Uio 



Wright Brothers 

NATIONAL MEMORIAL 



NORTH CAROLINA 



; t d' & 




-> r r* - — - ~ 





I 



THE 

NATIONAL PARK 

SYS.T^M 



k 



iOCf j g 



EASTERN 
UNITED STATES 




AN INVITATION 



The national park service of the Department of the 
Interior invites you to the areas of the National Park System, 
which are the property of all Americans. It urges you, when 
you visit them, to take advantage of the opportunities offered 
to learn more about them ; and it asks your assistance in pro- 
tecting the natural and historic features found in them. 

Revised 1956 



■'. 



Appomattox 

Court 




iUM 



4iLP 1 2 

Copy 1956 



ouse 



■ 






'> 1 




NATIONAL HISTORICAL 



I 4 OCT § 



#/sk 



■• 





BL ■ 





NATIONAL MONUMENT 



NEW MEXICO 

X-E r6g 








'. 




i 






anyon 




* 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



ARIZONA 



x-E rbG *ho 





OPEN ALL YEAR 






ftPH I? 



Carlsbad 
Caverns 





OPEN ALL YEAR 



t 



CEDAR BREAKS ^ 

National Monument 

31 4JU! Z"\ 



Utah 

X-E l&tt 




SITUATED HIGH ON the Markagunt Plateau 
in southwest Utah at elevations reach- 
ing 10,700 feet, the monument contains 
a gigantic multicolored natural amphitheater. 
The Pink Cliffs, a part of the Wasatch forma- 
tion, have a thickness here of nearly 2,000 
feet. They are eroded into fantastic shapes 
and display an amazing variety of color, 
47 different shades having been recognized. 
With everchanging lighting accentuating 
tints of the vividly colored rock formations, 
sweeping vistas, and attractive wildflowers, 
Cedar Breaks National. Monument offers 
superlative scenic values. One of the most 
spectacular views is from nearby Brianhead, 
which has an elevation of 11,315 feet. 

The monument is roughly 4 miles long by 
2l/ 2 miles wide, covering an area of almost 
10 square miles. It is surrounded by Dixie 



National Forest. Two-thirds of the area is 
high cliffs and steep talus slopes. 

The name "Cedar Breaks" is confusing to 
many visitors since cedar trees are not evident 
in the area. Junipers, which the early settlers 
called "cedars," grow nearby, but at eleva- 
tions considerably below the rim of the am- 
phitheater. The settlers also referred to the 
canyons and cliffs as "breaks" or "badlands." 

HISTORY 

Early exploration of the Markagunt Plateau 
began in 1851 when the Mormons settled in 
Parowan and Cedar City, in the valley to the 
west. In 1852, church leaders explored the 
headwaters of the Sevier and Virgin Rivers, 
which rise on the plateau, but made no report 
concerning the cliffs known today as Cedar 
Breaks. 



Photo: Amphitheater from Point Supreme (Courtesy Union Pacific R. R.) 



Chalmette 









NATIONAL HISTORICAL 
PARK ^ * LOUISIANA 



• 



4jF ^ 




*-.#* 







_^-*" 



' fe * 








& Commemorating the Battle of New Orleans ^r 



' 







•'''*r--,' V^J&L 

■ - •■-■,, ;,-^?*r- 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA and MARYLAND 






' 





the 



hickamauga Battlefield 



CHICKAMAUGA AND CHATTANOOGA 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

Georgia and Tennessee 



X-E 1<>0 




MaaHi 



#117 



Colorado 



X-E UT» 




National Monument 



c 


o 


L 


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A D 

■ 


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1 

■ ■ 







fWers 




tfm 



X-E 160 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 
IDAHO 




KENTUCKY 



VIRGINIA 



TENNESSEE 



' 



#?0\ 

DEVILS TOWER 



.Uu 




*~" NATIONAL MONUMENT, WYOMING 

1906-1956 



r 



DEVILS TOWER 



NATIONAL MONUMENT, WYOMING 
1906-1956 




EVERGLADES 





$2cH 



f X-E 160 



\Fort^ Jefferson 

\ f NATIONAL MONUMENT 



M. 




Florida 




FORT 



$3of 



4 OCT 9 

||.OW"~-I .' 



NECESSITY 



X-E f6(J 







£»»^ 




NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD SITE 

PENNSYLVANIA 



f 




#9o7 



Fort Washington 



MARYLAND 




—, ■ 



mmM 

* J ... 



, ' •« • ' 









t2& 

Fdedebicksbueg mo SpotsylvAniA 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

i tSfcOECICKS&UBC, VlOOtNtA * 



"•.:" 



m 



— Ibob 




x-e I6cr ^ 
.Tit. 



>EIF -GUIDING TOUR 
331 TUt DATTLEtltlDS 








x-E I6G 



George Washington 

CARVER 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • MISSOURI 





NATIONAL MILITARY PARK • Pennsylvania 






■ 

'i 



mM 



n Quivira 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 
NEW MEXI<~c\ 



W 










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' 



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I 



Great Smoky 
Mountains 



NATIONAL PARK 





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
INTERIOR • Douglas McKay, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE • Conrad I. Wirth, Director 



I 



Great Smoky 
Mountains 

NATIONAL PARK 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
INTERIOR • Douglas McKay, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE . Coarad L. Wi'rth, Director 



X-E I6ff 



Guilford Courthouse 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



North Carolina 



4 OCT 3 
!py 







'. 



X-E 160 



. ■ I 



Hampt( |fe:.r: i^J *w 

NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 

Maryland 




ftel« 

HARPERS FERRY 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



X-E 160 





NATIONAL PARK /M 




HAWAII 



OPEN ALL YEAR 




Home of , y h 

FRANKLIN D. 






ROOSEVELT 




I 




OMESTEAD 



X-E 160 




*m *2P* i 



W NATIONAL MONUMENT ' 

yh „ • ... 



NEB V- K \ 

■"■! 

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f 




X-E 160' 

#2^ 



Ul 



mm Vfflagt 

NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE • Pennsylvania 



3 




JEFFERSON 



NATIONAL 
EXPANSION 
MEMORIAL 

St. Louis, Missouri 



$771 



40CT 



4UUI | < 

W- -4956 



iwr'^wpwiiiii 



X-E f60 




' 



ennesaw Mountain 




#>:W 



o 



NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD 
PARK 



Lb* 



mm 




*■ -■ Hflll 




GEORGIA 



■ 



- 




ennesaw Mountain 



v»z 



— o 



x-e leu 



TJ 

NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD* 
PARK . __- 

_IL> 1 



f 




JfrE 160 +<W 



SUNSET POINT 

SELF- GUIDING 

NATURE TRAIL 








Mammoth Cave 



National Park, Kentucky 



f. 




4 SEP * *> 

I Copy 1956 



#230 



X-E 1 60 
til. 



anassas 

(Bull Run) 





N A ONAL PARK 

COLORADO 




* .*. 



4Ftd ' 
r» rn « 101 

— - . ■ 






. U u 

Moores Creek ^33 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 




x-e teo 




h 



Moores Creek 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



$23H 



•■•":. /■ /— '.• 




•■ 




X-E 1 <>ffl ' , 



cmulgee 

NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 



GEORGIA 





NATIONAL PARKS 
CALIFORNIA 



r 







STONES 



x-E 160 

XL \s> 



tt?^ 




NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

TENNESSEE 



stone! 



4 JOl. Z° 

[Copy 1956 



#X3 



RIVER 




NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

TENNESSEE 



x-e no 

Theodore Roosevelt 

NATIONAL MEMORIAL PARK 




Vanderbilt 
Mansion 



#245" 



X-E Ibff 
V-u, 



NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 




' -A —.-..- 



*>Hi> 



Walnut 



X-E 16ff 

Canyon 









*■'*.?' & 



4 

J" 



!'-■•*? *& -S.X-* Jt-OiS* JR.. 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



if II ■ * 7H * 

/ellowdone 



NATIONAL PARK 

i 

x-E i bo Wyoming 

Montana 

Idaho 



ii 



py— 



m 



— 







(MAP OF PARK INSIDE) 
FOR YOUR SAFETY 

While in geyser or hot springs areas, STAY ON CON- 
STRUCTED WALKS AND KEEP YOUR CHILDREN ON 
THEM. A fall into a boiling pool is fatal,- in many places, 
ground crust that looks safe and solid is thin — dangerous to 
walk on. 

BEARS, DEER, AND OTHER LARGE ANIMALS ARE 
POTENTIALLY VERY DANGEROUS. OBSERVE THEM 
FROM A DISTANCE, DO NOT FEED THEM. 



Z .U6 : 

AN ANNOUNCEMENT/^ /&? 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

to OUT-OF-TOWN 

SCHOOL GROUPS 

VISITING 

WAS*! V TON, 




-r~T^ 





•• 




X-E Hff 

A . . #35/ 

A|o Mountain Drive 

ORGAN PIPE CACTUS 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 

ARIZONA